A full customize integrity

There is a perception that suits can be made to measure, but shirts can be purchased in many stores as ready wear item. We agree that nowadays there are so many brands which offer readymade nice shirts at decent price. But, as a bespoke person, many of our clients would disagree with that concept and prefer to order their unique style shirts customized as they like and with our designers’ support.

Because ready shirts are not fitted well and need so many adjustments if it is possible to do so. Our full customize integrity allows our clients to choose any material, color, or different color combinations, classic, casual, or mixed smart casual styles and many more things choosing our service. We differ from readymade shirt suppliers with our flexibility to change the product or craft it from zero being trendy and classic at the same time.

Twill fabrics

Twill fabrics are easily recognizable because they will show diagonal weave or texture. The diagonal effect can range from very fine, subtle twills to much larger Imperial or Cavalry twills. Twills will almost always have a bit of shine, though the degree can depend on the weave, color, and cotton used.

Twill is an extremely tight weave, that can come in extremely high thread counts, some of which might be mistaken for silk. Because of the diagonal texture twill is a bit softer than broadcloth and will drape more easily. Twill won’t give you the same “crisp” look that freshly pressed broadcloth can, but it’s relatively easy to iron and resistant to wrinkles.

Pinpoint Oxford

Pinpoint (also referred to as pinpoint oxford) has the same weave as oxford cloth, although it uses a finer yarn and tighter weave. It is more formal than oxford cloth, but less formal than broadcloth or twill. Think of them as great everyday work shirts, but not necessarily the first recommendation for special events.

Pinpoint fabrics are generally not transparent and are slightly heavier and thicker than broadcloths. Because of their heavier construction, pinpoints are fairly durable fabrics. Opt for a twill or broadcloth if you’re looking for a formal shirt.

Chambray

Chambray is a plain weave fabric. That means it has a similar construction to broadcloth, though it is generally made with heavier yarns for a more relaxed or workwear appeal. Generally there will be white threads running in the weft/width direction such that the fabric has an inconsistent color to it.

This could be compared to an end-on-end, though chambray is generally much heavier and more appropriate for casual wear than dress.

Dobby

Dobby (which is very similar to Jacquard, although technically different) can vary widely. Some versions are quite similar to broadcloth in terms of thickness and weight, while others can be thicker or woven to almost look like twill.

Many dobby fabrics have stripes woven into them, although some are solid colors. The solid colors tend to have a faint stripe or dotted patterns woven in the same color as the base cloth.

End-on-end

End-on-end broadcloths are a very popular type of dress shirt fabric with a distinct contrast coloring. Woven with colored thread in the warp and white thread in the weft, it looks like a true solid from a distance, but has more texture when seen from up close. Typically a lighter weight fabric, it’s a great choice for those living in warmer climates.

Oxford

Oxford Cloth is very similar to pinpoint oxford, except it uses a slightly heavier thread and looser weave. It has a slightly rougher texture but is more durable than most fabrics. It’s composed of a symmetrical basket weave where one yarn may cross two yarns.

Originally developed for sportswear, so it’s the least dressy, and (in some circles) not considered appropriate for office or formal wear. Oxford cloth has always been a staple in traditional American button down polo shirts. It can be worn slightly wrinkled straight from the dryer and still look great.

Poplin

Poplin is so similar to Broadcloth that we decided not to distinguish between the two in our fabric descriptions. For all practical purposes you can equate the two. They are both a plain weave fabric that is going to be quite thin, smooth and flat.

That said, technically Poplin is different than Broadcloth in that Poplins can have different weight yarns in the warp and weft while broadcloths will have a a symmetrical construction. For example, broadcloths could be 100/2×100/2 (meaning 100s two-ply in the warp and weft) while a poplin could be 100/2×60/1 (meaning 100s two-ply in the warp and 60s single-ply in the weft).

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In your appointment, you will know about
Suit definition which type of suit you need, wedding, casual, daily use, business, other events
Which accessories you will need in your wardrobe
Which fabric to go for

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